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Let’s talk about sex – myth busters edition

As far as we’ve come, educating children about sex remains taboo. This was demonstrated by the national response to Safe Schools which, above anything else, brought anxiety about what children would be exposed to in the curriculum – gay and lesbian sexual health, masturbation, and reproductive anatomy were some topics that caused upset. I found the three most contentious myths, presented with a side of factual evidence. Enjoy!

Talking about sex will encourage it

A very common fear about introducing sex education early is that this will encourage children to do it. However, the most significant influencers for early sexual debut are:

  • Childhood sexual abuse
  • Exposure to pornography
  • Peer or partner pressure
  • Drugs and alcohol
  • Media
  • Volatile family relationships

Current findings have demonstrated that the majority (69%) of senior school students surveyed across schooling systems (including Christian schools) are sexually active in some way. This rate of sexual activity has remained fairly static over the last decade. As sex education and access to contraception has increased in comparison to previous decades, rates for this age group are at a historic low.

Rather than being morally panicked, it is worth understanding that sex will find its way into children’s lives whether it is through the media, their peer group, or worse, pornography. Less education, particularly when it comes from unreliable sources, is more likely to lead to risk-taking behaviour or poor preparation for eventual sexual activity, both of which can lead to the contraction of STIs, unwanted sexual experiences, and unplanned pregnancy.

Sex is an inevitable, natural part of development that, like driving a car, requires a solid base of knowledge for success. This will increase the likelihood of safe sexual behaviour and the understanding of how to confidently deal with situations that may arise. If knowledge is power, then conversely, lack of knowledge in this area is vulnerability and risk.

Learning about anal sex is an unnecessary minority group issue and it doesn’t need to be taught as part of sex education

Although less common (around 10% of students surveyed reported that they had tried it), anal sex does occur during the teenage years, and not just in gay partnerships. Various forms of oral sex are also common in teenagers, usually as a prelude to becoming sexually active. This may be surprising but anal and oral sex among teenagers and adults is nothing new and didn’t come about because of gay rights, as the Kinsey report on human sexual behaviour uncovered in the 1950s (yes – as conservative as this era was, people still experimented and disclosed this to researchers). This seminal report on human sexuality pre-dates Safe Schools, the plebiscite, and any significant gay rights action by more than half a century.

Many teenagers are experimenting with various forms of sexual activities, whether the matter is spoken about at school or not. Not educating them about the preventative measures against sexually transmitted infections puts them at risk. Even if anal sex were a ‘minority group issue’, being more educated on the whole picture of sexuality helps to challenge ignorance and there is no harm done by simply knowing more – in the same way that it does not harm boys to learn about menstruation. I dare say teenagers are not at risk of adding anal sex to their repertoire merely by learning about it, given that it is a fairly adventurous activity, even by adult standards.

And – as I always say – if two years of hardcore abstinence education in a fundamentalist Christian school didn’t turn me straight or abstinent, a few lessons about different sex acts given to senior school students will not force anyone to go out and try them.

My child isn’t watching pornography so I don’t need to educate them about it

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Pornography exposure (for boys AND girls) is far more common than most people would assume. Even teenagers (and children!) with the most vigilant parents had seen it at some stage. These images often contain violent, objectifying, unrealistic, and otherwise inappropriate depictions of sex. Repeated exposure to pornography as a teenager’s first experience of sex can cause their brain to be conditioned to instant gratification and unrealistic ideas of what can be expected from a sexual relationship. The real event can turn out to be a let-down because genuine sex lives don’t work in the same way as pornography. This can have life-long implications for a person’s libido and relationships, in the same way that excessive exposure to technology can harm a child’s social skills. Nonetheless, there is no getting rid of it so educating our young is our best counter-attack.

Taking phones out of bedrooms and changing the Wi-Fi password is no longer enough. If we don’t want our teenage sons and daughters to have their sexual peak in front of a smart phone with a handful of moisturiser, we need to ensure that we educate them about the long-term sexual risks of engaging with pornography. In the same way that we warn our children about photos in magazines not being conducive to healthy body image, we need to safeguard their expectations about what healthy relationships and sexuality looks like.

Quite frankly, it is about time that we all started talking about sex more openly with our adolescents and seeing quality sex education as a seatbelt, rather than a guidebook. That starts with educating ourselves and identifying, then challenging, some of the misinformation that is prevalent around these topics. Sexual health is as important as financial literacy, digital technology, and the core curriculum. We need to treat it with openness and be the grown-ups in getting the conversation started, including the parts we’d rather not talk about – so our children aren’t dealing with consequences they’d rather not deal with in their future.

Sources

Australian Institute of Family Studies

https://aifs.gov.au/cfca/2016/05/04/children-and-young-peoples-exposure-pornography

Amanda Dunn – The New Puberty (2016)

Anne Mitchell, Kent Patrick, Wendy Heywood, Pamela Blackman, and Marian Pitts (LaTrobe University)

http://www.redaware.org.au/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/31631-ARCSHS_NSASSSH_FINAL-A-3.pdf

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